Steil Urges President Biden to Use Remaining $1 Trillion in Federal COVID-19 Funds Before Spending More

February 4, 2021
Press Release

WASHINGTON, D.C.—Today, Congressman Bryan Steil (WI-01) urged President Biden to use more than $1 trillion in available allocated federal funding to fight COVID-19 before Congressional Democrats pass Biden’s $1.9 trillion spending proposal.

“In 2020, Congress and President Trump appropriated $4 trillion to fight coronavirus. As of today, more than $1 trillion has yet to be spent. I am concerned that Democrats will work to push a partisan spending bill through Congress. Under the current proposal, President Biden wants to put Wisconsin taxpayers on the hook to bailout fiscally irresponsible states like Illinois. It’s time to slow down the spending spree and focus on getting relief to people who need it, the vaccine distributed, kids in the classroom, and workers safely back to work,” said Steil.  

In today’s House Financial Services Committee hearing on the $1.9 trillion spending bill, Steil spoke out against it and highlighted why it is harmful to Wisconsin taxpayers. Watch Steil’s remarks here.

Read the letter to President Biden here.

In the letter, Steil writes: “Congress has already provided $4 trillion to respond to the COVID pandemic over the last year, and the last $900 billion in funding was signed into law just over a month ago on December 27, 2020. The official government tracker for agency spending on the COVID response was last updated with data through December 31, 2020, and it may not include new government commitments. However, according to a nongovernmental tracker of COVID relief funds by the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, $1.3 trillion currently remains available for the federal response to the pandemic. The wellbeing and security of American citizens is our priority. That said, solutions today should not cause tomorrow’s problems. In the case of this unchecked spending, we are on a dangerous path with an unsustainable fiscal crisis looming.”

 

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